Verse 15

19. Sanjaya exaggerates the chaotic noise that pervades the atmosphere in the hope that Dhrtarastra would get the message and call a halt to the war. The deafening sound that results from everyone sounding their conches demoralises the Kaurava forces. Unrighteous people tremble in fear even if they are physically stronger than their opponents. The same sound has no such effect on the Pandava army who are fired with a higher ideal.

The noise is within. Desire and its modifications – anger, greed, delusion, arrogance and envy – cause mental agitations. Even then people do not learn their lesson. They believe the source of their problem is outside!

 

Verse 16

 

20 – 21. Arjuna’s entry is dramatic. The earth and sky reverberate as ominous signs of the devastation that is to follow. His flag with the monkey logo signifies Hanuman’s promise to support Arjuna.

Arjuna had planned the battle for many years. He knows it is his obligation to restore justice and virtue in the state. He is alert and geared up for war. Yet a little later there is sudden loss of clarity and confusion. This is the destructive nature of the mind.

Krsna is referred to as Hrsikesa, lord of the senses, and Acyuta, one who is never vanquished. Sanjaya wants to communicate to Dhrtarastra that the Pandavas are invincible as they have Krsna on their side. The Kauravas do not have even the slightest chance of victory. Unfortunately, Dhrtarastra does not get the message.

Dhrtarastra is addressed as Mahipati, lord of the earth. Dhrtarastra represents the mind. The mind projects the world. A doctor’s mind creates a medical world, a politician sees a political world, a student lives in a student’s world. Thus we are all Mahipatis, lords of our respective worlds. If you see a world that is not conducive, you cannot directly change the world. All you have to do is change your thoughts, your mind. The world will change dramatically!